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There are many key symbols when testing to ascertain the qualities of a shuttle. Here’s the process I use.

1) Take of all the shuttles from the tube and test every single Mavis 350 shuttle. This first test tells me whether I have a right dozen to use or whether there are damaged shuttles in the tube that may be okay for practice but wouldn’t be good enough for an association match. You’d be shocked how many brands I test where there are 8 or 9 good shuttles in a tube! This is important to note as you are paying for 12 good shuttles.

Consider this. If I am paying to say, per tube, then each shuttle will cost me. If there are eight good shuttles, then the cost get increased per shuttle. The rest I may use, but some are best thrown off. Normally, training shuttles are the used shuttles from matches.

 

If I am paying for per Mavis 350 shuttle, grossed to a full tube, this will equate to per tube. The top rated shuttles cost less than this. Club shuttle shoppers please take note. Only by examining this way will you know either you get value for money with your existing shuttles. If you are only getting 8/9 good shuttles in a tube, then it is cheaper to purchase more expensive shuttles where you get 12 good shuttles. Most clubs do not bring this into consideration and buy on headline price.

Mavis 350

 

2) With my first test, I also make sure that each shuttle is traveling the same distance. Those shuttles that are a lot slower or faster should be dropped from the group as bad shuttles. They also should not be utilized in a competition because they are the wrong pace. Again, this defines that I have less than the dozen I paid for.

If all the shuttles operate well and at the correct pace, then they have passed the first inspection, as they are fit for a competition. They have also shown consistency and excellent flight qualities.

3) The next step for me is to utilize the shuttles in coaching or games. This concludes the strength of the shuttle, gives me valuable knowledge in respect of how they fail (e.g. through a feather hanging out, folding, etc.) and the other flight components from high lifts to the rear court watching the spin and drop. Finally, there is the great feel of the racket. How does the shuttle feel? Is it stable, light, hollow or dark?

Mavis 350

Here’s my Top Feather Shuttlecocks

Mavis 350 top of the range shuttle. In my view, this shuttle is so close to Yonex Aerosensa 50. It’s an impressive shuttle, superb flight, durable, constant and excellent in quality.

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